Arrest in Texas transgender woman’s strangulation death

DALLAS — A 24-year-old man has been charged with murder in the strangulation death of a Dallas transgender woman. Jimmy Eugene Johnson II was arrested near Huntsville, Texas.

CBS DFW

He was driving a car seen in surveillance video from the Dallas apartment complex where 26-year-old Carla Patricia Flores-Pavon was found dead on May 9.

A Dallas police statement issued Thursday says Johnson revealed that he had goods stolen from the woman’s apartment. The police statement says there is presently no evidence of a hate crime.

CBS DFW reports that police said the motive in the case was robbery and that Pavon was not targeted for her “transgender lifestyle.”

Deputy Chief Thomas Castro tells The Dallas Morning News that Johnson and Flores-Pavon had been engaging in online chats.

Johnson is confined to the Walker County Jail in Huntsville under $500,000 bond.

The Human Rights Campaign says 28 transgender Americans died in homicides in 2017 and 10 have died so far this year.

Source Article

Mishandled Dallas housing program could cost $1.3M

DALLAS (AP) — A report says Dallas officials should repay $1.3 million in federal funds after mishandling a program meant to renovate dilapidated houses for low-income homeowners.

The Dallas Morning News reports that the federal housing department’s Office of Inspector General report released this week examined more than a dozen homes remodeled by Dry Quick Restoration. The report found the homes had defective workmanship and long construction delays.

The report criticized the city for not properly vetting the company when issuing contracts in 2015.

A March newspaper investigation found the company’s owner has ties with a local housing official now suspended pending an internal probe.

Surveillance footage captured a cougar roaming around the streets and peaking through a window of a Brookfield, Wisconsin family’s home on February 18.

Dan and Bridget Guerndt, the home’s owners, were not aware of the unlikely visitor until they saw the paw prints in the snow and decided to check their Nest security camera. The cougar can also be seen walking up and down the block on the survailance video.

Officials with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources confirmed the cougar sighting in Brookfield, according to reports. The animal has been roaming around the area and appears to be passive, leading DNR officials to believe it was injured. Homeowners in the area have been warned of its presence, the animal is believed to be about a year old weighing 50 pounds. Credit: Dan Guerndt via Storyful

Media: Storyful

The city says it’s working with federal officials to address the issues. City Manager T.C. Broadnax says Dallas shouldn’t have to repay the funds because the money went into the homes.

Dry Quick declined to comment.

___

Information from: The Dallas Morning News, http://www.dallasnews.com

Source Article

State GOP leader: Make N.J. affordable (so we don’t lose folks to Texas!)

By Tom Kean Jr.

A recent opinion piece by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott encouraged overtaxed New Jerseyans to consider relocating to the Lone Star State.

Abbott was likely emboldened by Gov. Phil Murphy’s budget plan to raise state spending by nearly $3 billion, funded with billions in income, business and sales tax increases on New Jerseyans.

He apparently understands, unlike our governor, that New Jerseyans already shoulder one of the greatest tax burdens in the nation.

He’s probably seen how many of our families, retirees and businesses of all sizes have been worn down by rising costs and convinced to leave New Jersey for other states with lower and more predictable tax bills. Likely sensing Murphy’s overreach, Abbott took the opportunity to highlight the tax benefits of moving to Texas.

A combination of public and private marketing efforts have helped Florida, North Carolina and Pennsylvania — among others — to lure away millions of New Jerseyans in recent years, including many of our prized employers. The sales pitch is almost always the same — those places are more affordable and have lower taxes than New Jersey.

New Jersey is filled with talented entrepreneurs and highly skilled employees from one of the most desirable markets in the world. It’s no surprise then that others would attempt to take advantage of our governor’s extreme tax plans to try to convince more New Jerseyans to move in their direction, with offers of cheaper housing, reasonable taxes and attractive career opportunities for young professionals.

Once they start looking, families and innovators may be surprised to find that income tax rates have remained stable in states as seemingly different as Massachusetts (flat 5.1 percent) and Virginia (top rate of 5.75 percent), regardless of the changing party affiliations of their governors over time. Income tax predictability, at lower rates, has been the key to success in other states.

All of these poaching efforts have had a real impact on New Jersey.

An analysis by the New Jersey Business & Industry Association of census and Internal Revenue Service data from 2004 to 2014 determined that New Jersey lost approximately 2 million residents, 75,000 jobs and $18 billion in adjusted gross income.

The latest IRS data from 2016 showed a net outflow of $3.6 billion in income, equating to a loss of about $100 million in state tax revenues.

Further, a July 2017 report by McKinsey & Company found that middle- and high-skill millennials are the most likely to leave New Jersey, with 85 percent of those leaving in 2015 ranging in age from 18 to 35.

New Jersey businesses are losing talent to other states. New Jersey’s industries are losing the ability to grow because of the lack of skilled human resources. Our state is losing on its investment in higher education, in its families and in its future.

What’s most disconcerting is that our governor doesn’t even appear to recognize that New Jersey is in a competition with other states, much less recognize that it’s focused almost exclusively on taxes, affordability and opportunity.

That’s clear from his response to Abbott in a Dallas Morning News opinion article, in which Murphy discussed his focus on making New Jersey taxes "more fair."

He doesn’t realize that families and businesses aren’t driven by immeasurable promises of "tax fairness," but by dollars and cents. People look at their paychecks, bank-account balances and credit-card bills to judge how they’re doing each month. If those metrics are stable or improving, they’re likely to stick around. If they’re sliding in the wrong direction, they’re more likely to consider leaving.

The obvious solution to keep New Jerseyans in the Garden State is to focus on affordability.

With our state budget on track to end the fiscal year with a significant surplus, it shouldn’t be difficult. There’s simply no need for the billions in new taxes the governor has proposed. We should cut state government spending, not increase it. We should shelve Murphy’s expensive plans to create a state bank that would make risky loans at taxpayer expense. We should hold off on his "free" community college proposal that will cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars while doing little to improve college affordability. The list could go on.

New Jersey is a wonderful state with much to offer. Many of the people who feel forced to leave would love to stay. We can make that happen. Hopefully the governor changes course before it’s too late.

Tom Kean Jr., R-Union, is the minority leader in the New Jersey Senate.

One of two entrances to the Caven Point section of Liberty State Park.

Source Article

Dallas apartment proprietor, who cares enough to succeed, might invest in repairing or enhancing of his or her dummy post

Dallas apartment proprietor, who cares enough to succeed, might invest in repairing or enhancing of his or her apartment in order to boost the opportunity and keep up the apartment all their life in ship shape while profiting off it. This is particularly engaging and makes the tenants who need to lease Dallas apartments to call for action. By starting correspondence with you through email or telephone, the tenant is already showing enough interest and you need to take over from there.
Continue Reading →

Texan Bank CEO Appointed to Texas Southern University Board of Regents

HOUSTON, April 25, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Texan Bank announces appointment of CEO to Board of Regents of a prestigious Houston area university.

The Governor of Texas Greg Abbott has appointed Texan Bank’s Chief Executive Officer Kenny Koncaba to the Board of Regents for a term to expire on February 1, 2023. "I sincerely appreciate Governor Abbott appointing me to the Texas Southern University (TSU) Board of Regents. TSU is a dynamic institution of higher learning, and I look forward to serving TSU students, faculty, and administration into the future," stated Koncaba.

Koncaba also serves as a Director on the Board of Innovative Alternatives, as well as the Friendswood Education Foundation Board. He is a former gubernatorial appointee to the Texas Housing and Health Services Coordinating Council and the Board of Pilot Commissioners for Galveston County Ports.

About Texan Bank
Based in Houston TX, Texan Bank is a full-service, local community bank offering business and personal banking with four locations across Houston, Sugar Land, Clear Lake, and Friendswood. Purchased in 2011 by Friendswood Capital Corporation, Texan Bank serves its communities through doing business the right way and inspiring employees through servant leadership.

For more information, visit www.texanbank.com.

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/texan-bank-ceo-appointed-to-texas-southern-university-board-of-regents-300636397.html

SOURCE Texan Bank

The information on this page is provided by PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Reproduction or redistribution of this content without prior written consent from PR Newswire is strictly prohibited. Dallas Business Journal is not responsible for this content. Learn more about this service.

Source Article

TX Firefighters Injured in Gas Line Blaze

Gas from a line that had been struck caught fire early Sunday evening in Arlington, injuring two firefighters and a water department employee.

Arlington, TX, Fire Department

April 16 — Gas from a line that had been struck caught fire early Sunday evening in Arlington, injuring two firefighters and a water department employee.

Arlington Water Utilities crews were clearing asphalt to to reach a water line leak at Dugan Street and Ditto Avenue when a gas line was struck about 6:45 p.m., Fire Department Lt. Mike Joiner said.

Firefighters and Atmos Energy workers responded and were pumping excess water out so that they could begin repairs when the gas ignited, he said.

The firefighters and the water department employee were taken to Parkland Memorial Hospital, and only one firefighter remained hospitalized Sunday night.

Firefighters remained on the scene to control the fire while Atmos workers repaired the leak. Police were also there to help with traffic control.

Power and water were cut off to the immediate area Sunday night while repairs were completed.

___

(c)2018 The Dallas Morning News Visit The Dallas Morning News at www.dallasnews.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Join the conversation!

No comments have been added yet. Want to start the conversation?

Source Article

More Americans Are Moving to Texas

This Friday, Jan. 14, 2011, file photo shows highway traffic with the Dallas skyline in the background. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

Texas continues to be America’s fastest-growing state, the U.S. government Census Bureau says.

Six of the nation’s top 10 largest-gaining counties between July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017, were in Texas, the bureau recently said in a news release.

The fastest-growing area in the country was the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metropolitan area which includes 13 counties in Texas. It gained 146,000 residents last year.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Molly Cromwell is a demographer at the Census Bureau. She said the Dallas area “attracts large numbers from both international and domestic migration.” In other words, the area draws people moving within the United States and those moving to the United States from other countries.

Many large metro areas in the country, Cromwell explained, depend mostly on “international migration and natural population increase for growth.

Lloyd Potter is Texas state demographer at the University of Texas San Antonio. He said in a statement that people most likely relocate to Texas for its “resilient economy” and cheaper housing costs.

Potter added that oil and gas production continue to be a major part of the state’s economy, but other sectors, such as information technology, manufacturing and biomedicine are important sources of job growth.

In addition to good jobs and cheap housing, Texas is one of the seven states with no state income tax.

Demographers expect Texas to continue to grow, though its rate of growth may slow down.

While domestic migration is a major reason for Texas’s growth, recent international immigration is also up. And people are coming to the state from “a greater variety of nations than in the past,” Potter added.

Texas state demographers have observed an increase in immigrants from Asian countries and a decrease from Latin American countries — especially Mexico.

Potter said, “With this, migration will not only increase the size of the state’s metro areas, but also will lead to greater population diversity in these areas.”

I’m Jonathan Evans.

VOA’s Matt Hilburn reported on this story. Xiaotong Zhou adapted it for Learning English. Ashley Thompson was the editor.

_____________________________________________________________

Words in This Story

demographer – n. the person who studies changes (such as the number of births, deaths, marriages, and illnesses) that occur over a period of time in human populations

domestic – adj. of, relating to, or originating within a country and especially one’s own country

resilient – adj. able to become strong, healthy, or successful again after something bad happens

biomedicine – n. medicine based on the application of the principles of the natural sciences and especially biology and biochemistry

Source Article